Rice University logoShell Center for Sustainability
 
Top blue bar image
  • Shell Center for Sustainability
  • Shell Center for Sustainability
  • Shell Center for Sustainability
 
Facebook btnRSS

Mission

The Shell Center for Sustainability's mission is to foster an interdisciplinary program of research, outreach, and education to address actions that can be taken to ensure the sustainable development of communities' living standards, interpreted broadly, to encompass all factors affecting the overall quality of life.

Experts Directory


The Rice Sustainability Experts Directory contains a listing of faculty actively involved in sustainability research. The directory lists experts by name and area of research. It lists work taking place in their area of study that focuses on environmental, economic and social impact.
SCS funded project experts marked with:funded_faculty_icon_small 

Search SCS Research 
by Yearby Departmentby Subject 




Anthropology
Architecture
Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Business, Jones Graduate School of
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering
Chemistry
Civil and Environmental Engineering
Earth Science
Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Mechanical Engineering
Political Economy
Sociology, Department of
Statistics, Department of

 

Anthropology section
Cymene Howe1
Dr. Cymene Howe

Assistant Professor
Department of Anthropology
Rice University


Dr. Howe's research is concerned with how forms of subjectivity, knowledge and advocacy become produced within distinct social and political contexts. Howe's research project (currently in its initial phase) is a collaborative investigation, with Dominic Boyer, to better understand the political cultures and implementation practices of renewable energy projects. While there has been substantial global attention to the politics of climate change at the level of international conferences, protocols and agreements, there is little anthropological research that has addressed how these global, moral and ecological imperatives can be implemented at the local level. Working in the Isthmus of Tehauntapec (Oaxaca, Mexico) which is corridor to some of the world’s richest wind resources and where many large wind parks are in place (or in development), our project will involve the key stakeholders and “brokers” of wind development projects in the region, including government officials, local residents and activists, transnational wind power corporations and journalists. Ultimately, we are interested in exploring what we term “energopolitics” as an alternative to the biopolitical genealogy of modern state formation.


Stephen A. Tyler
Dr. Stephen A. Tyler

Professor
Hubert S. Autrey Professor of Anthropology
Department of Anthropology
Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Biolinguistic Diversity

Research in coopeation with Matt Shibatani and Gail M. Coelho, Dept. of Linguistics, Rice University. Funded by Shell Sustainability Project. Investigation of "language death" and how marginal languages can persist in the contemporary world where only a few written languages are hegemonic.
Architecture section 
(return to top) 

WTCpic

 Dr. William T. Cannady
Professor of Architecture and Director of the Center for Professional Studies
School of Architecture

Rice University

Will Cannady is a teacher and practicing architect. As a Professor of Architecture at Rice University since 1964, he teaches both undergraduate and graduate design studios. The undergraduate studio is focused on sustainable design principles applied to real-world projects such as urban mixed-use housing complexes. The graduate Urban Design and Investment Building Design Studio investigates real estate investment projects such as mid-rise, high density, mixed use, mid-town transit oriented developments. This studio provides opportunity for cross discipline collaboration through the use of a wide array of consultants and experts from outside the university and team work with MBA students from Rice's Jones School of Management. Professor Cannady has served as a visiting lecturer and critic at the following institutions: American Academy in Rome; Architectural Association of London; Hydra II Conference, Hydra, Greece; University College London; University of California at Berkeley; University of Kentucky; University of Tennessee; Utah State University; University of Michigan; Texas A & M University; The University of Houston; Texas Tech University; University of Texas at Arlington; Prairie View University; Harvard University; University of Texas at Austin and Iowa State University.
In his architectural practice, Cannady has designed and built over two hundred projects, which have been honored with ffty awards, both nationally and locally, for outstanding design. His teaching pedagogy and built work is rooted in the philosophy "the poetry of pragmatism." This approach aspires to preserve tradition while pioneering change. His academic and professional experience covers a wide range of design problems and building types including residential, commercial, institutional and public. His constructed buildings are intended to be easy to build, use, maintain and enjoy.
Current projects in Will's private practice include a large house on Buffalo Bayou in Houston's River Oaks subdivision; a no-rent, low income, multi-family housing project for the Texas Medical Center; and a major renovation of the Cohen House, the Faculty Club of Rice University.
 


Nonya_Grenader
Dr. Nonya Grenader

Professor in Practice
Associate Director of Building Workshop
Rice University 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project: 

Installation, Implementation and Analysis of the Ze-Row Solar House 

Nonya Grenader has co-taught the first-year design studio at the School of Architecture since 1994. She is a Professor in Practice and the Associate Director of the Rice Building Workshop. Her work with students through the Rice Building Workshop has resulted in many published projects and design awards. Over the past ten years, three hundred students have designed and built projects at various scales in the community, from exhibit venues in Houston museums to affordable housing at Project Row Houses in Houston's Third Ward. The Workshop received the 2004 NCARB Prize for the "Integration of Practice and Education" from the National Council of Registration Boards and the "Collaborative Practice Award" in 2005 from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. RBW exhibited their latest project, Ze-Row House, at the Solar Decathlon in Washington, D.C. in 2009. Principal of her own small firm, Nonya's recent projects have received design awards from AIA/Houston and from the Greater Houston Preservation Alliance. She received the "Educator Award" from the AIA/Houston in 1990, and in 2000, she was elected to the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects. She was recently co-chair of the 99K House Competition sponsored by Rice Design Alliance and AIA/Houston in partnership with the city of Houston. She has served as President of the Rice Design Alliance and as editor and a contributor to RDA's publication, Cite: the Architecture and Design Review of Houston. 

 


Christopher Hight
Dr. Christopher Hight

Associate Professor

School of Architecture

Rice University 

 funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Development of a Long-range Sustainability Plan for the Upper Texas Coast 

Christopher Hight is an associate professor at the Rice University School of Architecture, where he is pursuing design and research on architecture’s potential at the nexus of social, natural and subjective ecologies within the built environment. In collaboration with colleagues and student researchers he has recently completed a design strategy for the bayou system in Houston, available at www.hydraulicty.org, and is working with John Anderson on a book examining alternative models of coastal development based on the case study of Galveston Island. He has been a Fulbright Scholar and obtained a masters degree in Histories and Theories of Architecture from the Architectural Association, and a Ph.D. from the London Consortium at the University of London. He has taught in the Architectural Association’s Design Research Laboratory, and has worked for the Renzo Piano Building Workshop. He has lectured and published internationally in books and journals including Harvard Design Magazine, Praxis, Perspecta, and AD. He is the co-editor of Space Reader: Heterogeneous Space in Architecture (2009), and AD: Collective Intelligence in Design (2006), and has recently published a book on subjectivity and epistemology since the middle of the 20th century, Architectural Principles in the Age of Cybernetics (2008). He also serves on the Board of Directors for the Rice Design Alliance.

 


Tom_Lord
Mr. Tom Lord

Lecturer in Architecture

School of Architecture

Rice University

From July 1965 to February 1967, Mr. Lord was the Analyst in Housing and Urban Affairs for Congressional Research Service, an organization designed to serve the research needs of the U.S. Congress. During this period, Mr. Lord worked on legislation for the Rent Supplement and Model Cities Programs.
From February 1967 to November 1967, Mr. Lord served as Assistant Director of Urban America, Inc. a private organization supported by the Ford Foundation in Washington, D.C. In this capacity he aided in the establishment of private housing development corporations in Detroit, Philadelphia, Washington, D.C., Buffalo, and Corpus Christi. In May 1967, Mr. Lord was invited by the Mayor’s Citizens’ Advisory Committee on Housing to determine the feasibility of a housing development corporation. Mr. Lord has taught housing management courses at Texas Southern University, housing law at the University of Houston, and is a lecturer at Rice University’s College of Architecture.
 


Rice_logo_photo_not_available
Dr. Albert Pope

Gus Sessions Wortham Professor of Architecture

School of Architecture

Rice University

Albert Pope is the Gus Sessions Wortham Professor of Architecture. He has taught in the school's Graduate Program at Rice for 15 years and is currently the director of the school's thesis program.
Professor Pope holds degrees from SCI-Arc and Princeton, and taught at Yale University and SCI-Arc before coming to Rice. His design work has received awards from Progressive Architecture as well as national and regional awards by the American Institute of Architects. He is the author of Ladders (Princeton Architectural Press, 1997) and numerous articles concerning the broad implications of post-war urban development. Professor Pope's current research is involved with the phenomenological impact of urban infrastructure. It specifically addresses the role that infrastructure plays in the construction of a contemporary subjectivity. The architectural vehicles of this research are the subdivision, the tower and the blind box.
 


Danny Marc Samuels
Dr. Danny Marc Samuels

Smith Visiting Professor And Director Of Rice Building Workshop

School of Architecture
Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Installation, Implementation and Analysis of the Ze-Row Solar House

Danny Marc Samuels, FAIA, is the Smith Visiting Professor and the Director of the Rice Building Workshop. After apprenticing with Guillermo Jullian in Paris and Venice, he founded,
with partners John J. Casbarian and Robert H. Timme, the internationally recognized design firm, Taft Architects, in 1972. The work of this Houston-based offce has received over 60 major design awards, and has appeared in over 200 articles in books and journals worldwide. Samuels, with his partners, has lectured at over 100 professional and educational forums, nationally and internationally. Together they are recipients of the Houston AIA Educator Award and the Houston AIA Firm Award. Samuels is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome, and in 1991 was elected to the College of Fellows of the American Institute of Architects.
Samuels' and Associate Nonya Grenader's work with students through the Rice Building Workshop has resulted in a stream of realized projects: over the past ten years, more than two hundred students have designed and built projects at various scales in the community -- from exhibit venues in Houston museums to affordable housing at Project Row Houses in Houston's Third Ward. The Workshop received the 2004 NCARB Prize for the "Integration of Practice and Education" from the National Council of Registration Boards and the "Collaborative Practice Award" in 2005 from the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture. Samuels' and Grenader's strong interest in the processes of making also carries into their work with First Year Design Studio.


Rives_Taylor
Dr. Rives Taylor
Lecturer

School of Architecture
Rice University


Rives Taylor has more than 25 years experience in institutional and commercial architecture with 18 years spent focusing on strategic planning, programming, and sustainable design. Rives casts a wide net in elevating both the why and how of sustainable design, including students, faculty, professionals, public officials and the general public. In 17 years as adjunct professor at the University of Houston and visiting professor at Rice University, Taylor has influenced more than 5,000 students in his technical and high-performance design studios
and seminars. The approaches Rives developed for Gensler not only affect the firm’s extensive practice but also influence clients’ building decisions worldwide. He developed a firm-wide green practice primer called “The Four Tiers of Sustainability,” led the inclusion of sustainable design in the firm’s in-house education program, and in partnership with Architecture 2030 and the Design Futures Council, developed an “eco-charrette” process and developed a building performance metric that is now used in all of Gensler’s projects. Design and construction standards Rives developed for clients such as BP and Toyota are now embedded in those clients’ protocols and are followed worldwide.



Rice_logo_photo_not_available
Frank White
Gus Sessions Wortham Professor of Architecture

School of Architecture

Rice University

Albert Pope is the Gus Sessions Wortham Professor of Architecture. He has taught in the school's Graduate Program at Rice for 15 years and is currently the director of the school's thesis program.
Professor Pope holds degrees from SCI-Arc and Princeton, and taught at Yale University and SCI-Arc before coming to Rice. His design work has received awards from Progressive Architecture as well as national and regional awards by the American Institute of Architects. He is the author of Ladders (Princeton Architectural Press, 1997) and numerous articles concerning the broad implications of post-war urban development. Professor Pope's current research is involved with the phenomenological impact of urban infrastructure. It specifically addresses the role that infrastructure plays in the construction of a contemporary subjectivity. The architectural vehicles of this research are the subdivision, the tower and the blind box.
 


Sarah Whiting
Dr. Sarah Whiting
Dean
School of Architecture
Rice University


Whiting is a design principal of WW Architecture and currently serves as Dean of the Rice University School of Architecture. She has previously taught at institutions such as Harvard's Graduate School of Design, the Princeton University School of Architecture, the Illinois Institute of Technology, the University of Kentucky and the University of Florida.

She received her Bachelor of Arts from Yale University and a Master of Architecture from Princeton before going on to receive a Ph.D from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She had previously worked in the offices of Peter Eisenman, Michael Graves, and the Office for Metropolitan Architecture, where she served as a designer for the Euralille master plan, among other projects.

Rice_logo_photo_not_available
Dr. Gordon Wittenberg
Professor of Architecture
School of Architecture
Rice University


Gordon Wittenberg is a Professor and Director of the Technology, Environment, and Practice Program in the School of Architecture, and a partner in WO Architects. He teaches design studios in both the undergraduate and graduate cores and the introductory course in technology: "Introduction to the Science and History of Building," as well as a seminar in "Advanced Materials and Systems." When Professor Wittenberg frst came to Rice his primary focus was teaching and research in the area of energy conservation and sustainability. He has written a number of articles and a book on the special problems related to cooling and comfort in hot, humid climates such as Houston and the traditional architecture of the South as a response to climate. More recently, Professor Wittenberg has been involved in experimenting with ideas about environment, design, and materials through the work of his architectural frm, WO Architects. Since the firm was started in 1991, it has won many awards for excellence in design including a TSA award in 2004 and awards from both the masonry and metal building industries.


Biochemistry and Cell Biology 

(return to top)
George Bennett
Dr. George N. Bennett
E. Dell Butcher Professor
Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology
Rice University
funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Reducing Energy Use & Carbon Dioxide While Producing Industrial Chemicals by Efficiently Engineered Mircobial Processes

 George Bennett, E. Dell Butcher Professor of Biochemistry & Cell Biology at Rice University, received a BS in Chemistry from the University of Nebraska and his PhD from Purdue University. He was a postdoctoral fellow at Stanford University. He has contributed to defining biochemical mechanisms of stress responses and metabolism of Escherichia coli and Clostridium acetobutylicum.  With E. coli these studies have included defining mechanisms of regulation of gene expression and physiology by acidic environmental conditions, metabolic engineering for acetate reduction, modification of redox cofactor availability, and reprogramming of metabolic networks for chemical production.  With the anaerobic C. acetobutylicum, studies have concerned genes and enzymes of butanol formation and the biodegradation of nitroaromatics. His current research interests include metabolic engineering of microbes for chemical production, generating genetic tools for synthetic biology and investigating the mechanisms of environmental responses of bacteria. He is interested in using microbes for sustainable industrial, agricultural and environmental processes. 
 

KYSan 

Dr. K.Y. San
E. D. Butcher Professor in Bioengineering and Professor of Chemical Engineering
Department of Biochemistry and Cell Biology

Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Reducing Energy Use & Carbon Dioxide While Producing Industrial Chemicals by Efficiently Engineered Mircobial Processes
 
K.Y. San is a professor in the department of Bioengineering and Department of Chemical Engineering along with being a member of the Institute of Biosciences and Bioengineering at Rice University. In addition, his research is in the area of metabolic engineering. K.Y. San's research laboratory is mainly concerned with the development of new concepts and novel ways of altering metabolic routes in Escherichia coli using recombinant DNA technology to improve cellular activities and achieve more advanced production systems. The main focus is on the development of a framework for the systematic analysis of the cellular responses in regulating its metabolic activities upon precise genetic perturbations. Understanding these responses is critical to design organisms and processes for efficient and reliable manufacturing of gene products from recombinant cells. 

 

 Business, Jones Graduate School of  

(return to top) 

DougSchuler 

Dr. Douglas A. Schuler
Associate Professor of Business and Public Policy
Jones Graduate School of Business
Rice University

 funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
 Capteur Soleil and Social Enteprise 


Business and government relations, globalization of business, social enterprise

 

Chemical_Biomolecular_Engineering 

Dr. Janet Braam
Professor
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Department
Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Genetic and Environmental Imapact on Lignin Accumulations
 


Walter G. Chapman

Dr. Walter Chapman
William W. Akers Professor
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department
Rice University
 

 funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Gas Hydrates

 
Dr. Walter Chapman is the William W. Akers Professor in the Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department at Rice University.  Walter joined the Rice faculty in 1990 after receiving a bachelors degree from Clemson University, a Ph.D. from Cornell University and a couple of years with Shell Oil Company. Walter is widely recognized for applications of his research in the energy and high performance polymer industries.  The theories Walter has developed to predict fluid properties and interfacial structure of complex fluids have been widely adopted in industry, academia, and national laboratories.  His research focuses on flow assurance issues of asphaltenes and gas hydrates, polymer solutions and blends and associating fluids.  Walter is also widely recognized for experimental studies of water content in hydrocarbons at extremes of temperature and pressure. Among his recognitions are visiting professorships at TU Berlin and TU Denmark and an Outstanding Young Alumni Award from Clemson University.  In 2010, he received the Donald L. Katz Award from the Gas Processors Association in recognition of outstanding accomplishments in gas processing research and excellence in engineering education.  Walter has also received several teaching awards at Rice including the 2001 Nicolas Salgo Distinguished Teaching Award, the 2001 Graduate Student Association Teaching Award, and a 2011 George R. Brown Award for Superior Teaching.  Since 2005, Walter has been the Director of the Energy and Environmental Systems Institute at Rice University.
 


George Hirasaki

Dr. George Hirasaki
A. J. Hartsook Professor in Chemical Engineering
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Department
Rice University
 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Gas Hydrates


Professor Hirasaki joined the Rice faculty after a 26 year career with Shell Development and Shell Oil Company. His research in fluid transport through porous media ranged from the microscopic scale intermolecular forces governing wettability to the megascopic scale numerical reservoir simulators for field-wide modeling.
A reoccurring theme throughout this research is the dominance of interfaces in the determination of fluid transport processes. Fluids flow through rock and soil in pore spaces that are on the order of microns. The relative transport of phases and components are governed by the degree of wetting of the solid by the fluid phases and the sorption of species on the fluid and solid surfaces in addition to the usual transport coefficients such as viscosity and diffusivity. 

 


Rice_logo_photo_not_available
Dr. Clarence A. Miller
Louis Calder Professor Emeritus in Chemical Engineering Research
Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering Department
Rice University


Interfacial phenomena, especially those involving surfactants, are the focus of Professor Miller’s current research.
 


Matteo Pasquali

Dr. Matteo Pasquali
Professor in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering Department
Rice University
 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project: 

 Water Membrane Technologies
 
Matteo Pasquali's research focuses on processing flows of microstructured liquids. Micro-structured liquids are ubiquitous in the chemical, polymer processing, coating, food, and biomedical industries. Theoretical and computational modeling of flow and transport in microstructured liquids will be a very important tool to design new processes and apparatus that can produce defect-free products at high rate with minimal environmental impact. Conventional transport laws based on classical irreversible thermodynamics fail to describe transport in liquids like polymer melts, solutions, blood, and dough. In recent years, two new approaches have appeared to model flow and transport in microstructured liquids. One method (mesoscopic) introduces field variables obeying transport equations to represent average local values of the liquid microstructure. The other method (micro-scopic) represents the microstructure by means of a large number of micromechanical contrivances distributed in the flow volume and following stochastic differential equations. The equations of the mesoscopic models include several phenomeno-logical coefficients, whereas the microscopic models depend on few parameters that can be estimated often from knowledge of the liquid's molecular structure. Microscopic models are presently impractical for process modeling because their equations are computationally much more expensive than those of the mesoscopic models.
Another important open problem in the study of polymeric liquid flow is the experimental determination of the interaction of flow and microstructure. Conventional techniques (e.g. flow birefringence) are now being ported from rheometric flows to prototype process flows. Meanwhile, new methods like fluorescence microscopy have proven effective to study the dynamics of polymeric liquids in rheometric flows.
 


Kyriacos Zygourakis
Dr. Kyriacos Zygourakis
A.J. Hartsook Professor
Chair of the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering
Rice University
 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
 Carbon Sequestration Through Bio-char Soil Amendment
Sustainable Production and Development of Biodiesel in Texas
 

 Carbon Capture and Sequestration
 
Kyriacos Zygourakis' research interests span several important areas of bioengineering and reaction engineering. Applied mathematics, computer simulations, video microscopy, and digital image processing are integral parts of my research methodology. 

 
 

Chemistry

Andrew Barron

Dr. Andrew R. Barron
Charles W. Duncan, Jr. - Welch Chair of Chemistry
Professor of Materials Science
Associate Dean for Industry Interactions and Technology Transfer
Department of Chemistry 

Rice University
 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:  

 Water Membrane Technologies
 
Prof. Barron is the Charles W. Duncan, Jr. – Welch Chair of Chemistry, a Professor of Materials Science, and the Associate Dean for Industry Interactions and Technology Transfer at Rice University. Research in the Barron Group is currently aimed at the development of rational molecular design approach to materials synthesis, with an emphasis on the leap from synthesis to application of nano-based materials. Since 2002, the focus of research within the Barron Research Group has involved the functionalization of fullerenes and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Areas being investigated include: biological applications and interactions, catalysis and materials applications. Functionalization of fullerenes as amino acids allows for their inclusion into polypeptides for the development of new approaches to the treatment of flagrant diseases. The development of a catalytic approach for the amplification of SWNTs may be likened to the polymerase chain reaction for DNA and is aimed at the fabrication of specific nanotube structures for energy applications. Prof. Barron created the first educational programs at Rice to span the Schools of Science, Engineering and Management, and is also a co-director of the Rice Alliance for Entrepreneurship. He is also actively involved with educational programs in collaboration with the Rice section of the Society of Automotive Engineers. Prof. Barron is the Charles W. Duncan, Jr. – Welch Chair of Chemistry, a Professor of Materials Science, and the Associate Dean for Industry Interactions and Technology Transfer at Rice University. Research in the Barron Group is currently aimed at the development of rational molecular design approach to materials synthesis, with an emphasis on the leap from synthesis to application of nano-based materials. Since 2002, the focus of research within the Barron Research Group has involved the functionalization of fullerenes and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Areas being investigated include: biological applications and interactions, catalysis and materials applications. Functionalization of fullerenes as amino acids allows for their inclusion into polypeptides for the development of new approaches to the treatment of flagrant diseases. The development of a catalytic approach for the amplification of SWNTs may be likened to the polymerase chain reaction for DNA and is aimed at the fabrication of specific nanotube structures for energy applications. Prof. Barron created the first educational programs at Rice to span the Schools of Science, Engineering and Management, and is also a co-director of the Rice Alliance for Entrepreneurship. He is also actively involved with educational programs in collaboration with the Rice section of the Society of Automotive Engineers.
 


 Robert H. Hauge
Dr. Robert H. Hauge
Distinguished Faculty Fellow in Chemistry
Department of Chemistry 

Rice University 
 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:  

Nanotechnology & Energy
 
Prof. Barron is the Charles W. Duncan, Jr. – Welch Chair of Chemistry, a Professor of Materials Science, and the Associate Dean for Industry Interactions and Technology Transfer at Rice University. Research in the Barron Group is currently aimed at the development of rational molecular design approach to materials synthesis, with an emphasis on the leap from synthesis to application of nano-based materials. Since 2002, the focus of research within the Barron Research Group has involved the functionalization of fullerenes and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Areas being investigated include: biological applications and interactions, catalysis and materials applications. Functionalization of fullerenes as amino acids allows for their inclusion into polypeptides for the development of new approaches to the treatment of flagrant diseases. The development of a catalytic approach for the amplification of SWNTs may be likened to the polymerase chain reaction for DNA and is aimed at the fabrication of specific nanotube structures for energy applications. Prof. Barron created the first educational programs at Rice to span the Schools of Science, Engineering and Management, and is also a co-director of the Rice Alliance for Entrepreneurship. He is also actively involved with educational programs in collaboration with the Rice section of the Society of Automotive Engineers. Prof. Barron is the Charles W. Duncan, Jr. – Welch Chair of Chemistry, a Professor of Materials Science, and the Associate Dean for Industry Interactions and Technology Transfer at Rice University. Research in the Barron Group is currently aimed at the development of rational molecular design approach to materials synthesis, with an emphasis on the leap from synthesis to application of nano-based materials. Since 2002, the focus of research within the Barron Research Group has involved the functionalization of fullerenes and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). Areas being investigated include: biological applications and interactions, catalysis and materials applications. Functionalization of fullerenes as amino acids allows for their inclusion into polypeptides for the development of new approaches to the treatment of flagrant diseases. The development of a catalytic approach for the amplification of SWNTs may be likened to the polymerase chain reaction for DNA and is aimed at the fabrication of specific nanotube structures for energy applications. Prof. Barron created the first educational programs at Rice to span the Schools of Science, Engineering and Management, and is also a co-director of the Rice Alliance for Entrepreneurship. He is also actively involved with educational programs in collaboration with the Rice section of the Society of Automotive Engineers.
 


John McDevitt
Dr. John T. McDevitt
Brown-Wiess Professor of Bioengineering and Chemistry
Lab-on-a-Chip Sensor Technologies Laboratory
Department of Chemistry 

Rice University

 
John T. McDevitt is a pioneer in the development of “integrated nano-bio-chip” technologies. Efforts in this area have the potential to replace high-cost, lab-based, and time-consuming diagnostic tests with inexpensive, battery-powered diagnostic devices with immense clinical impact– especially in developing countries and remote settings where traditional laboratory measurements are not practical. One of these nano-bio-chip systems used for salivary testing in prehospital settings for heart attacks was just selected by Popular Sciences for the Best of What’s New (2008) in the Medical Devices category. In 1996, McDevitt developed the concept for and launched a research program directed towards microchip-based technology suitable for the rapid analysis of complex fluids. His basic science and dedication to the translation of research prototypes led to the development of two new classes of mini-sensors for measuring and analyzing solutions that contain a wide range of biological and nonbiological analytes including toxins, drugs, metabolites, bacteria and blood products. His work led to one of the largest patent portfolios in the history of the University of Texas (UT) at Austin. Two centers, the Beckman Center for Chemical Sensors and the Army Research Office MURI Center for Biological Sensors, were established at UT to support these efforts. Currently, McDevitt is a principal investigator for a large, multi-site clinical program sponsored by the National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), part of the National Institutes of Health. The project targets the development and application of next-generation salivary diagnostic devices for oral and systemic diseases such as cardiac, stroke and cancer applications. His research at Rice uses nanometer-sized building blocks to develop extremely tiny sensors that may be described as “lab-on-a-chip” systems. The CD4 microchip technology developed in his laboratories provides simple, rapid, and affordable methods for counting white blood cells in HIV/AIDS patients. This approach has successfully been validated in human trials in Boston hospital settings and in an HIV reference laboratory in Botswana, Africa. McDevitt’s research has been supported by significant funding from the NIH, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Welch Foundation, the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation, the NSF, the Office of Naval Research, and others. His work has been highlighted in more than 160 peer-reviewed manuscripts; has been featured in Science, Business Week, and Popular Science; and on NIH Web sites. He has authored more than 150 patents and patent applications. These innovations were selected as part of the Science Coalition’s Best Scientific Advances in 1998, and he has received a number of notable awards including the Presidential Young Investigator Award, and the Exxon Education Award. 

 

Civil and Environmental Engineering 

JimBlackburn

Dr. Jim Blackburn
Practice in Environmental Law
Department Civil and Environmental Engineering

Rice University 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Measuring City Sustainability: Project Houston (2011)Rice University-Nankai University Partnership 

Jim Blackburn is a practicing environmental lawyer with the firm of Blackburn Carter and Professor of the Practice in Environmental Law in Civil and Environmental Engineering Department at Rice University where he serves as the Director of the Undergraduate Minor in Energy and Water Sustainability.  Blackburn teaches “Sustainable Design” (CEVE 302/502) as well as “Introduction to Environmental Law” (CEVE 406) and “Global Environmental Law and Sustainable Development” (CEVE 306/506).  His research includes work with the SSPEED Center on “Lessons Learned From Hurricane Ike” where he studies coastal resiliency and long-term sustainability as well as work with the Shell Center for Sustainability where he has completed a paper titled “Measuring City Sustainability:  Project Houston”.  Sustainability-related awards received by Blackburn include the Barbara C. Jordan Community Advocate Award presented by Texas Southern University in 2007, the National Conservation Achievement Award in 2001 from the National Wildlife Federation and the Bob Eckhardt Lifetime Achievement Award for coastal preservation efforts from the General Land Office of the State of Texas in 1998.  He was awarded an honorary membership in the American Institute of Architects for legal work associated with urban quality of life issues in 2003.  In October 2004, Texas A&M press published his manuscript titled The Book of Texas Bays, which focuses upon the current environmental health of bays in Texas and the efforts undertaken to protect them.
 


Daniel Cohan
Dr. Daniel Cohan

Assistant Professor

Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering
Rice University
 

 SCS Project:
Sustainable Production and Development of Biodiesel in Texas
 

Daniel Cohan is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University.  His research specializes in the development of photochemical models and their application to air quality management, uncertainty analysis, energy policy, and health impact studies.  Before joining Rice, Dr. Cohan worked for the Air Protection Branch of the Georgia Environmental Protection Division. He received a B.A. in Applied Mathematics from Harvard University, a Ph.D. in Atmospheric Chemistry from Georgia Tech, and served as a Fulbright Scholar to Australia.  Dr. Cohan is a recipient of an NSF CAREER award and a member of the NASA Air Quality Applied Sciences Team.

 


RobGriffin
Dr. Robert Griffin
Associate Professor, Master, Hanszen College
Department Civil and Environmental Engineering

Rice University
 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Understanding Mercury Chemistry in the Atmosphere of Houston, Texas


Robert Griffin received his B.S. from Tufts University in 1993 and his M.S./Ph.D. from Caltech in 1997/2000 (all in chemical engineering). Between Tufts and Caltech, Dr. Griffin was a Research Assistant at Arthur D. Little, Inc. Previous academic appointments were held at Duke University and the University of New Hampshire. Dr. Griffin's research interests lie in performing field, laboratory, and computational experiments designed to understand the effects and behavior of organic species in the troposphere. These projects have been supported by NSF, NASA, EPA, NOAA, HARC, EPRI, CARB, the Dreyfus Foundation, and the Coordinating Research Council. Dr. Griffin's previous work has been published in journals that include Science, Environmental Science and Technology, The Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, Geophysical Research Letters, Atmospheric Environment, and The Journal of Atmospheric Chemistry. Dr. Griffin's teaching interests are focused on undergraduate courses in air pollution control and fluid mechanics and on graduate courses in atmospheric chemistry and atmospheric aerosols. He is a member of the American Association of Aerosol Research, the American Chemical Society, and the American Geophysical Union.
 


QilinLi
Dr. Qilin Li
Assistant Professor
Department Civil and Environmental Engineering

Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Environmentally Benign Control of Biofouling
Sustainable Water Infrastructure For Improving Public Health Protection
 


Dr. Qilin Li teaches courses and conducts research on physical and chemical processes that impact water quality in natural aqueous environment as well as water/wastewater treatment systems. Dr. Li’s current research focuses on the behaviors of environmental colloids and macromolecules at aqueous-solid interfaces and the subsequent impact on their fate and transport in natural and engineered systems. Ongoing research projects investigate fouling of membrane materials during surface water filtration, seawater desalination and wastewater reuse, nanotechnology enabled drinking water disinfection and surface microbial control, the environmental fate, transport and ecotoxicity of engineered nanomaterials, and sustainable water infrastructure. Dr. Li’s research group is devoted to finding a solution to sustainable water supply. 

 

Earth Science


John Anderson pic sm 1010
Dr. John B. Anderson

Department Earth Science
Wiess School of Natural Sciences

Rice University

 funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Development of a Long-range Sustainability Plan for the Upper Texas Coast

John Anderson received his B.S degree in 1968 from the University of South Alabama, his M.S. degree in 1970 from the University of New Mexico, and his Ph.D. in 1972 from Florida State University. He began his professional career at Hope College in 1972, where he was an assistant professor. In 1975, John joined the faculty at Rice University, where he is currently the Maurice Ewing Professor of Oceanography. He served as chairman of the department from 1992 through 1998. John has conducted research on various aspects of Antarctic marine geology since his first visit there as a student in 1970. He has participated in 24 scientific expeditions to Antarctica. The culmination of this research was published in "Antarctic Marine Geology" by Cambridge University Press. Anderson's other research has focused on the evolution of the northern Gulf of Mexico Basin (see Late Quaternary Stratigraphic Evolution of the Northern Gulf of Mexico Margin, Society of Sedimentary Geology Special Publication No. 79), and the response of coastal systems to global change. His most recent book is entitled "The Formation and Future of the Upper Texas Coast" and he recently co-edited a Geological Society of America Special Paper entitled "Response of Upper Gulf Coast Estuaries to Holocene Climate Change and Sea-Level Rise". John received the 1992 GCAGS Outstanding Educator Award, the 1996 Rice University Graduate Teaching Award, 2004 Rice University Presidential Mentoring Award, and was the 2007 recipient of the Society of Sedimentary Research Shepard Medal. He has served as associate editor for Geology, the American Geophysical Union Antarctic Research Series, American Association of Petroleum Geologists Bulletin, Sedimentology, and Marine Geology. He is a Fellow of the Geological Society of America and past president of the Society for Sedimentary Research. John has served on the AAS-Polar Research Board, on the 1997 NSF Oversight Panel for Polar Programs, and is currently chairman of the Antarctic Research Vessel Oversight Committee. He is also the Academic Director for the Shell Center for Sustainability.

Dugan
Brandon Dugan

Assistant Professor
Department Earth Science

Wiess School of Natural Sciences

Rice University
 

 funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project: 

Gas Hydrates

Dr. Dugan's research focus is on the hydrodynamics of the shallow crust (0-5 km). Through observation, theory, and experimentation, he studies the interaction of subsurface flow, sediment deformation, and slope failure. Dr. Dugan is particularly interested in how physical properties (e.g., porosity, permeability, compressibility) vary in response to stress perturbations and fluid content (water and hydrocarbon), and how these properties influence sediment strength. It is important to understand these processes to describe fluid/sediment dynamics in the shallow subsurface, to define the conditions of sediments that are eventually buried deeper, and to understand the nature of sediments involved in submarine slope failures. The results are applicable to understanding the hydrodynamic processes in accretionary prisms, gas hydrate provinces, and terrestrial environments. Dr. Dugan uses numerical models to describe interaction of geology and fluids as basins and flow systems evolve. Currently he is using models to understand the generation of overpressure, fluid flow processes, and sediment stability along passive continental margins. The research documents that passive margins are active and exciting centers for coupled geological processes such as faulting, slope failure, and shallow hydrogeologic flow systems. At the experimental level, his research is two-tiered. Dr. Dugan performs deformation experiments on natural and reconstituted samples to evaluate in situ conditions and physical behavior of sediments over a wide range of stresses and temperatures. He characterizes the effects of mineralogy, grain size, fluid content, and phase changes (e.g. free gas becoming gas hydrate) on poro-elastic and flow behaviors of porous media. He also hopes to develop scaled experimental sedimentation models to observe active fluid flow and deformation processes. These models will provide a rare opportunity to observe and measure phenomena that often are not observed in nature, such as the conditions just prior to a submarine slope failure.

 


luttge
Dr. Andreas Lüttge

Professor of Earth Science and Professor of Chemistry

Department Earth Science

Rice University

The primary concerns of his research are surface chemical processes at minerals and rocks from low-temperature conditions up to the pressure and temperature conditions throughout the Earth's crust.
Andreas Luttge’s degrees are a Habilitation [venia legendi] (1995) and a PhD [Dr. rer. nat.] (1990) from the Eberhard-Karls-Universitaet Tuebingen (Germany). In 1995 the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation awarded a Feodor Lynen fellowship to Andreas Luttge to visit Yale University and to work with Prof. A.C. Lasaga.[2]
Luttge published numerous studies about the surface dynamics of minerals, glasses and metals,[3] including investigations of microbial activity at interfaces.[4] He applies various experimental techniques using Vertical Scanning Interferometry, Electron and Atomic Force Microscopy and modeling techniques like Monte Carlo and ab initio methods. Resulting quantitative kinetic rate data are key prerequisites to provide a better understanding of the dynamics governing many geologic and technological processes.

 


Carrie Masiello
Dr. Carrie A. Masiello

Assistant Professor

Department Earth Science

Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Genetic and Environmental Imapact on Lignin Accumulations

 The Response of Native Plant Mating Systems to Climate Change 

 

 

 


  Dale S. Sawyer
Dr.
Dale S. Sawyer
Professor

Department Earth Science

Rice University 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project: 

Biodiversity-Forestry
 

Ecology_EvolutionaryBIO

Amy Dunham

Dr. Amy Dunham
Assistant Professor
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 

Rice University

 
Dr. Amy Dunham is primarily interested in the interactions of species in complex tropical forests and especially in relation to anthropogenic disturbances.  However, her research spans a wide range of  topics in ecology, evolution and conservation biology, from geographic and phylogenetic patterns of trait distributions and community assembly to impacts of extinction and invasion on trophic cascades and ecosystem processes, to studies of global climate change impacts on demography and species interactions.
 


 Nathaniel Holland III
Dr. Nathaniel Holland III
Assistant Professor
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 

Rice University

 
Born and raised in Richmond, Virginia, Holland received his B.S. degree in 1993 from Ferrum College, a small private liberal arts college in southwestern Virginia, where he majored in both Environmental Science and Biology with minors in chemistry and philosophy. Through his undergraduate advisor Dr. John Leffler, he developed an interest in the organismal and conservation biology of bats. As a result, Holland studied habitat choice of bats between 1° growth and 2° re-growth rainforests in Costa Rica and the winter cave hibernation, summer roosting, and foraging behavior of an endangered species in temperate forests of the Blue Ridge and Appalachian Mountains. Under the supervision of Dr. D.A. Crossley Jr., Holland earned an M.S. degree in Entomology in 1995 from the University of Georgia, where he studied how above-ground plant-herbivore interactions affect below-ground plant carbon allocation and soil food webs at the agroecosystem of the Odum School of Ecology. In 2001, Holland received his Ph.D. from the Department of Biology at the University of Miami, where his advisor Dr. T.H. Fleming and himself discovered the pollinating seed consuming mutualism between senita cacti and senita moths in the Sonoran Desert of Mexico. This is the third-know interaction in which the behavioral adaptation of active pollination by adult insects accompanies floral oviposition and larval fruit consumption of host plants. With grants from National Geographic and the National Science Foundation, Holland conducted theoretical and empirical studies of the population and evolutionary ecology of mutualism between senita cacti and senita moths for his dissertation. Holland was then awarded a "National Parks Ecological Research Postdoctoral Fellowship," a grant funded by the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation and the Ecological Society of America, with which he joined Dr. Judith L. Bronstein's lab in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at the University of Arizona. With this fellowship, Holland continued his studies of senita cactus/moth interactions, but at their northern distribution in Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument in Arizona. In 2003, Holland joined the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Rice University as an assistant professor, where Holland currently remain. 


William E.	Rogers
Dr. William E. Rogers 
Assistant Professor (1999-2003) 

Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology 

Rice University 

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project: 

Biodiversity-Forestry 

William Rogers joined the Texas A&M University Department of Rangeland Ecology and Management as an Assistant Professor in June 2005, specializing in Ecological Restoration and Invasive Species. He received his B.A. in Chemistry (1991) and Biology (1992) from Gustavus Adolphus College, MN and his Ph.D. in Biology (1998) from Kansas State University. His doctoral research was conducted at the Konza Prairie LTER site and focused on how fire and pocket gopher generated soil disturbances alter resource distribution, plant demography and productivity, and plant community dynamics across multiple spatial and temporal scales. 

Dr. Rogers was a member of the faculty at Rice University in Houston, Texas as a Huxley Research Instructor (1999-2003) and then as a Faculty Research Fellow (2003-2005) where he worked collaboratively with Dr. Evan Siemann on studies examining exotic plant invasions. Specifically, this ongoing research seeks to understand how local environmental factors (e.g., herbivores, fungal pathogens, resources, mycorrhizal symbionts, disturbance regime and recruitment limitation) interact with post-invasion evolutionary adaptations to determine the success of Chinese Tallow Tree (Sapium sebiferum) invasions in forests and grasslands throughout the southeastern United States. He has also established studies in the tree's native range of China and the Hawaiian islands where Chinese Tallow has been introduced, but is not invasive.

 

In addition to advancing our knowledge of exotic species invasions, Dr. Rogers is working on several research projects related to habitat restoration. He is currently involved in studies: (1) promoting the conservation of an endangered orchid species, (2) examining the use of hot summer fires to control woody encroachment in rangelands, (3) assessing the impact a non-indigenous animals (e.g., feral hogs, insect outbreaks) on forest regeneration dynamics, and (4) developing control strategies for Chinese Tallow Tree invasions in a variety of Texas ecosystems.


 jennifer Rudgers 

Dr. Jennifer Rudgers
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project: 
Genetic and Environmental Imapact on Lignin Accumulations 

Ecological theory has traditionally held that abiotic factors and antagonistic interactions are the primary determinants of population and community dynamics. In contrast, mutualistic interactions, in which both species benefit from their association, have received much less attention. Her research program uses plants, arthropods, and microbes to explore how mutualistic interactions affect population dynamics, community structure, and evolution.  Mutualistic microbes, in particular, contribute an important, but often overlooked, layer of diversity in ecosystems, and their inclusion in ecological research can increase the realism of both experiments and theory. Throughout her research, she has strived to tackle questions with both conceptual and applied significance. Advanced knowledge of the importance of mutualisms in both natural and managed ecosystems can help us to make better predictions about the ecological and evolutionary consequences of environmental change.  


 

 

Evan Siemann  

Dr. Evan Siemann
Ecology & Evolutionary Biology
Wiess School of Natural Sciences
Rice University   

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project: 

Biodiversity-Forestry 

Evan Siemann is an associate professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Rice University in Houston, Texas. He received his AB from Cornell University in 1990 and his Ph.D. from the University of Minnesota in 1997. The focus of his research has been investigating how local environmental factors (e.g. enemies, resources, disturbance regime and recruitment limitation) interact with post-invasion adaptation to determine the likelihood and severity of Chinese tallow tree (Sapium sebiferum) invasions into East Texas coastal prairie, mesic forests, and floodplain forests. The results of this research have been highlighted in Science Daily, Environmental News Service, and The Sciences. He has also recently begun to explore the ecosystem level impacts of exotic tree invasions into coastal prairies. His research group is also engaged in a number of applied research projects related to controlling exotic plant and animal invasions into Texas ecosystems. 


  K_Whitney
Dr. Kenneth Whitney
Assistant Professor
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology

Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
The Response of Native Plant Mating Systems to Climate Change


Calvin_Ward
Dr. Calvin H. (Herb) Ward
Foyt Family Chair of Engineering
Professor, Environmental Science and Engineering
Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
Rice University

 
Dr. Ward is the Foyt Family Chair of Engineering in the George R. Brown School of Engineering at Rice University. He is also Professor and former Chair of the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering and a Professor in the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology. Dr. Ward has undergraduate (B.S.) and graduate (M.S. and Ph.D.) degrees from New Mexico State University and Cornell University, respectively. He earned the M.P.H. in environmental health sciences from the University of Texas. Following 22 years as the organizing Chair of the Department of Environmental Science & Engineering at Rice University, Dr. Ward became the first Director of the Energy and Environmental Systems Institute (EESI), a university-wide program designed to mobilize industry, government, and academia to focus on problems related to energy production and environmental protection. Dr. Ward has also served as Director of the Department of Defense Advanced Applied Technology Demonstration Facility (AATDF), a distinguished consortium of university-based environmental research centers supported by consulting environmental engineering firms to guide selection, development, demonstration, and commercialization of advanced applied environmental restoration technologies for the DOD. For 18 years he directed the activities of the National Center for Ground Water Research (NCGWR), a consortium of universities charged with conducting long-range exploratory research to help anticipate and solve the nation’s emerging groundwater problems. He was also Co-Director of the EPA-sponsored Hazardous Substances Research Center/South & Southwest (HSRC/S&SW), whose research focus was on contaminated sediments and dredged materials. Dr. Ward has served as President of both the American Institute of Biological Sciences and the Society for Industrial Microbiology. He is the founding and current Editor-in-Chief of the international journal Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. He is a Fellow of the American Academy of Microbiology and the Society for Industrial Microbiology and a Registered Professional Engineer in the State of Texas. Dr. Ward served as Chair of the Scientific Advisory Board of the Strategic Environmental Research and Development Program (SERDP) for six years. During his 44-year tenure at Rice University, Dr. Ward's research has focused on microbial processes and engineering for surface and ground water quality. His current research involves microbial degradation of DNAPL source zones in the subsurface.

Economics, Department of

 Dagobert L. Brito
Dr. Dagobert L. Brito

Professor
Peterkin Professor of Political Economy
Department of Political Economics
Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Nanotechnology & Energy

Economic Theory, Public Finance.

Malcolm Gillis
Dr. Malcolm Gillis

Professor
Department of Economy
Rice University


Public Finance, Economic Development, Natural Resources.

PerterHartley
Dr. Peter Reginald Hartley

George and Cynthia Mitchell Chair in Sustainable Development and Environmental Economics
Professor of Economics
Department of Economy
Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Integrated Economic Environmental and Reliable Modeling of Power Systems Growth
Nanotechnology & Energy
Carbon Capture and Sequestration

Peter Hartley grew up in Australia. He completed an honors degree in mathematics in 1974, and a Masters Degree in Economics in 1977, at the Australian National University. From 1975-77, he worked for the Priorities Review Staff and the Economic Division of the Prime Minister's Department in the Australian Government. He obtained a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Chicago in 1980. From 1980 to 1986 he was an Assistant Professor of Economics at Princeton University. He was an Associate Professor of Economics at Rice University from 1986–1993, when he was promoted to Full Professor. He was chair of the Department of Economics at Rice from 2000–2005 and Academic Director of the Shell Center for Sustainability at Rice from 2007–2010. Peter is also a Rice Scholar of the James A. Baker III Institute for Public Policy, where he is affiliated with the Energy Studies Program. He was awarded the George and Cynthia Mitchell chair in Sustainable Development in the economics department in 2007. Peter also is currently Professor at Large in the Institute of Advanced Studies at the University of Western Australia. His research has covered a number of areas, but has recently focused on energy economics. With regard to sustainability, he is interested in the long-term transition of the economy to renewable energy sources and the relationship between energy use and its environmental impacts.

Robin Sickles
Dr. Robin C. Sickles
Reginald Henry Hargrove Chair of Economics
Editor-in-Chief: Journal of Productivity Analysis
Department of Economics
Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Carbon Capture and Sequestration


Applied Econometrics

TedTemzelides
Dr. Ted Temzelides
Department of Economics
Rice University


Dr. Ted Temzelides was born in Athens, Greece.  He earned a BA in Economics in Greece and a Ph.D. in Economics from the University of Minnesota in 1995. Before coming to Rice, Dr. Temzelides had taught various courses at the Tippie College of Business at the University of Iowa, the University of Pittsburgh, and while visiting the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania. He has consulted for the Federal Reserve as well as the European Central Bank. He is currently a Baker Institute Rice Scholar. His research lies in the intersection of Macroeconomics and Energy, where he studies issues related to trading in OTC markets, the role of R&D in renewable energy on economic growth, properties of emissions trading mechanisms, and strategic issues in oil and gas production. Dr. Temzelides’s research has received funding from the National Science Foundation and has been published in some of the leading academic economics journals, including Econometrica, The Journal of Political Economy, The American Economic Review Papers and Proceedings, and The Journal of Monetary Economics. Dr. Temzelides regularly serves as a referee for academic journals and is on the Editorial Board of the Journal Economic Theory.


Mechanical Engineering
Brent Houches
Dr. Brent Houchens
Assistant Professor
Mechanical Engineering
Rice University


funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
Installation, Implementation and Analysis of the Ze-Row Solar House


Brent Houchens received his B.S., M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.  His research interests are in the areas of fluid mechanics, heat transfer and magnetohydrodynamics modeling.  He studies bulk semiconductor crystal growth processing and fundamental fluid flows.  This work involves surface tension effects including thermocapillary driving, and electromagnetic effects including magnetic stirring and damping. Professor Houchens combines computational techniques such as spectral methods and linear stability analysis with regular and singular perturbation theory (asymptotics) to bridge numerical and analytical models.  This allows for the study of flows which are difficult to analyze from a purely numerical standpoint.

Dr. Jun Lou
Dr. Jun Lou

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering and Materials Science
Department of Mechanical Engineering
Rice Universit
y
funded_faculty_icon_small
SCS Project:
Environmentally Benign Control of Biofouling

Jun Lou obtained B.E. and M.S. degrees in Materials Science and Engineering from Tsinghua University and Ohio State University, respectively, and his Ph.D. degree from the Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering and Princeton Materials Institute at Princeton University. He then did his postdoctoral research in the Brown/GM collaborative research center at Brown University (Providence, Rhode Island) before joining Rice. His research interest lies in the following areas: Materials related issues and device developments for MEMS/NEMS applications; Size effects in mechanical integrity and electrical properties of metallic nanostructures; Interfacial behavior of NT/NW reinforced nanocomposites; Novel nano-fabrication methods with implications for Bio-nano interactions and sensing applications.

Sociology

Amy Myers Jaffe
Dr. Amy Myers Jaffe
Wallace S. Wilson Fellow in Energy Studies
Department of Sociology
Rice University

funded_faculty_icon_smallSCS Project:
The Water Footprint of Biofuels


Amy Myers Jaffe is the Wallace S. Wilson Fellow in Energy Studies and director of the Energy Forum at the Baker Institute, as well as associate director of the Rice Energy Program. Jaffe's research focuses on oil geopolitics, strategic energy policy including energy science policy, and energy economics. Jaffe was formerly senior editor and Middle East analyst for Petroleum Intelligence Weekly. She is widely published and served as co-editor of "Energy in the Caspian Region: Present and Future" (Palgrave, 2002) and "Natural Gas and Geopolitics: From 1970 to 2040" (Cambridge University Press, 2006), and as co-author of "Oil, Dollars, Debt and Crises: The Global Curse of Black Gold" with Mahmoud A. El-Gamal (Cambridge University Press, 2010). Jaffe also contributed to Foreign Policy's "21 Solutions to Save the World" (May/June 2007). She served as a member of the reconstruction and economy working group of the Baker/Hamilton Iraq Study Group, as project director for the Baker Institute/Council on Foreign Relations Task Force on Strategic Energy Policy, and as a principal adviser to USAID's project on "Options for Developing a Long Term Sustainable Iraqi Oil Industry." She currently serves as a strategic adviser to the American Automobile Association (AAA) of the United States and is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. Jaffe was among the Key Women in Energy-Americas honorees in the Pathfinders/Trailblazers category (2004), the honoree for Esquire's annual 100 Best and Brightest in the contribution to society category (2005), Elle magazine's Women for the Environment (2006), and was named to Who's Who in America (2008). Jaffe is a Princeton University graduate with a degree in Arabic studies.

StephenKlineberg
Dr. Stephen L. Klineberg
Director, Institute of Urban Research
Department of
Sociology
Rice University

Rice University
  A graduate of Haverford College near Philadelphia, Professor Klineberg received an M.A. in Psychopathology from the University of Paris and a Ph.D. in Social Psychology from Harvard. After teaching at Princeton, he joined Rice University's Sociology Department in 1972. The recipient of ten major teaching awards, including the George R. Brown Lifetime Award for Excellence in Teaching, he is a faculty associate and divisional advisor at Lovett College, where he twice served as Interim Master.
In March 1982, he and his students initiated the annual Houston Area Survey, now in its 29th year of tracking the changes in the demographic patterns, life experiences, attitudes, and beliefs of Harris County residents. The Houston region recovered from the collapse of the oil-boom in the 1980s to find itself squarely in the midst of a restructured economy and a demographic revolution. No other city in America has been the focus of a long-term longitudinal research program of this scope. None more clearly exemplifies the transformations that are refashioning the social and political landscape of urban America.
The project has attracted great interest and generous support from foundations, corporations, and individuals in the wider Houston community and beyond. That support has made it possible not only to fund these professional surveys, but also to expand the research each year with additional interviews in Houston's Anglo, African-American, and Latino communities. In 1995 and 2002, the surveys reached large representative samples from Houston’s Asian communities as well, with one-fourth of the interviews conducted in Vietnamese, Cantonese, Mandarin, or Korean.
Co-author of The Present of Things Future: Explorations of Time in Human Experience, Dr. Klineberg has written numerous journal articles and research reports, and appears frequently on radio and television. He is also the founding Co-director of Rice University’s “Institute for Urban Research.” Its mission is to provide a permanent home for the annual Houston Area Survey, stimulate other metropolitan research, sponsor educational programs, and engage in public outreach that advances understanding of pressing urban issues and fosters the development of more humane and sustainable cities.



Richard Johnson
Dr. Richard R. Johnson
Director of Sustainability
Rice Univers
ity

Richard received a B.S. in Civil Engineering from Rice University, and a Masters in Urban and Environmental Planning from the University of Virginia. He came into the newly-created position of sustainability planner in 2004. In 2007, he was promoted to the position of Director of Sustainability. In this role he coordinates, supports, leads, and provides technical assistance for a broad range of campus sustainability initiatives, including high-performance "green" building, recycling, energy conservation, and environmental education. Richard also serves as the Associate Director of the Center for the Study of Environment and Society (CSES). Richard holds an appointment as a Professor in the Practice of Environmental Studies in Sociology and has taught several classes at Rice. Richard is also a research fellow for the Kinder Institute for Urban Research.

  Statistics Department of
Katherine Ensor

Dr. Katherine Ensor
Professor and Chair of Statistics
Department of Statistics
Rice University

 
Dr. Katherine Ensor works on the theoretical development of statistical methods for practical problems. Her primary emphasis is the analysis of dependent data as it relates to environmental statistics and financial statistics. She has also done significant work in the area of simulation based estimation for stochastic processes. The underlying premise of this latter research effort is the practical implementation of stochastic models as a data analysis tool.
 


Erzsébet_Merényi 
Dr. Erzsébet Merényi

Research Professor
Department of Statistics
Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering
Rice University