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  • Shell Center for Sustainability
  • Shell Center for Sustainability
  • Shell Center for Sustainability
 
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Mission

The Shell Center for Sustainability's mission is to foster an interdisciplinary program of research, outreach, and education to address actions that can be taken to ensure the sustainable development of communities' living standards, interpreted broadly, to encompass all factors affecting the overall quality of life.

About Gulf Coastal Science Consortium (GCSC)

Over the coming decades our children and grand children will have to deal with a radically changing coast as the rate of sea-level rise continues to accelerate, declining sediment supply issues remain unresolved and hurricanes continue to take their toll.  The Gulf Coast is especially vulnerable to these changes and there is strong evidence that the current rate of coastal change is unprecedented.  Scientists know that the Mississippi Delta, the area of most rapid change and wetlands loss, has had a history of growth over the past few thousand years (Fisk and McFarlan, 1955; Frazier, 1967; Törnqvist et al., 1996. Day et al. 2007).  The same can be said for barrier islands, most of which are currently experiencing rapid change.  Along the upper Texas coast, there is strong scientific evidence that historical shoreline retreat for these barriers is unprecedented relative to the past several millennia (Wallace 2010; Anderson and Wallace, 2011; Wallace and Anderson, in press).  Recent studies of most of the larger bays of the Gulf Coast estuaries (Mobile Bay, Calcasieu Lake, Sabine Lake, Galveston Bay, Matagorda Bay, and Corpus Christi Bay) demonstrate that they experienced rapid change in the past when rates of sea-level rise were higher, but near the current rate (Anderson and Rodriguez, 2008 and references there in; Anderson et al., 2010).   

The level of awareness and response to coastal change varies widely across the region.  Louisiana leads the way in public awareness and action, but there the problem is more acute (State Coastal Master Plan 2012).  Texas, on the other hand, is in a state of denial and, along with Mississippi, Alabama and Florida, essentially lack any kind of concerted effort in public education about coastal change or programs designed to prepare for change. The State of Texas has a governor who has publicly denied global change, as did the entire congressional delegation of Louisiana.  Similar examples occur all along the Gulf Coast.  Part of the problem is that science is being ignored and the battle to preserve our coast is too often waged at the local level where it is least likely to be successful. It is time for the Gulf Coast scientific community to assume leadership to create a more sustainable coast.  The Gulf Coast Science Consortium is dedicated to assessing the state of scientific knowledge about impacts of Global Change on the Gulf Coast and conveying this information to policy makers, the media and the general public thereby encouraging a Gulf-wide coastal sustainability plan. 

Gulf Coast Issues 

The Gulf Coastal Science Consortium is dedicated to assessing the state of scientific knowledge about impacts of Global Change on the Gulf Coast and conveying this information to policy makers, the media and the general public thereby encouraging a Gulf-wide coastal sustainability plan.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Shell Center for Sustainability