Rice University logoShell Center for Sustainability
 
Top blue bar image
  • Shell Center for Sustainability
  • Shell Center for Sustainability
  • Shell Center for Sustainability
 
Facebook btnRSS

Mission

The Shell Center for Sustainability's mission is to foster an interdisciplinary program of research, outreach, and education to address actions that can be taken to ensure the sustainable development of communities' living standards, interpreted broadly, to encompass all factors affecting the overall quality of life.
2014 Workshop Header 

 

Planning Committee

John Anderson, Ph.D. 
Rice University 
  Phil Bedient, Ph.D.
Rice University 
  Sam Brody, Ph.D.
Texas A&M University 
  Claude Griffin
Shell Oil Company 
             
Jeff Nittrouer, Ph.D.
Rice University 
  Jamie Padgett, Ph.D.
Rice University 
  Lilibeth André
Rice University 
   

Speakers


Anderson pic 2 w
John Anderson 
  John Anderson, Ph.D. is the Maurice Ewing Professor of Oceanography at Rice University and the Academic Director of the Shell Center for Sustainability. His current research interests are in 1) the recent retreat history of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and those factors that regulated ice sheet retreat, and 2) The evolution of the US Gulf Coast and response of coastal environments to global change.

John has participated in 24 scientific expeditions to Antarctica. He has authored and co-authored over 200 refereed publications, edited 5 volumes and published two books, “Antarctic Marine Geology” (Cambridge University Press), and “Formation and Future of the Upper Texas Coast”.  John is past president of the Society of Sedimentary Research.  He has received several awards, including two Rice teaching awards, the Outstanding Educator Award of the Gulf Coast Geological Society and the 2007 Shepard Medal of the Society for Sedimentary Research.

PRESENTATION: HOW SUSTAINABLE IS THE TEXAS COAST? 

VIDEO: SESSION 1

 
Bedient Phil pic 2 w
Phil Bedient 
  Dr. Philip B. Bedient is the Herman Brown Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University, and has been studying urban hydrology for the past 35 years, including major floodplain studies; storm water studies, water quality studies, and radar-based flood alert systems for Texas. Dr. Bedient is lead author of a textbook entitled "Hydrology and Floodplain Analysis", used in over 70 universities.  Dr. Bedient is currently director of the SSPEED Center, which will organize leading universities, researchers, emergency managers, and associated technologies to address severe storm impacts in the Gulf Coast area. SSPEED is designing resilient solutions for hurricane storm surge for the entire Galveston bay system using advanced computer models and teams of experts.

PRESENTATION: SEVERE STORM IMPACTS IN THE PRESENCE OF HURRICANE SURGE 

VIDEO: SESSION 3

 
Blessing pic 2 w
Russell Blessing 
  Russell Blessing's research is primarily concerned with understanding the impacts of varied urban development patterns on built and natural land cover types and understanding how these varied patterns effect the resilience of socio-ecological systems.  The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), the conceptual models of landscape ecology, and spatial modeling, critical tools he uses to test hypotheses of urban-environment development dynamics.  He is currently a Ph.D. student in the Urban and Regional Science program at Texas A&M University and conducts research with the Center for Texas Beaches and Shores with an emphasis on inland and surged based flood risk and mitigation.  He has a Masters in Urban Planning from Texas A&M University and a BA in Environmental Studies and Biology from Austin College.
 
Brody pic 2 w
Sam Brody 
  Samuel D. Brody, Ph.D. is a Professor and holder of the George P. Mitchell ’40 Chair in Sustainable Coasts in the Departments of Marine Sciences and Landscape Architecture and Urban Planning at Texas A&M University.  He is the Director of Center for Texas Beaches and Shores and the Co-Director of the Institute for Sustainable Coastal Communities. Dr. Brody’s research focuses on coastal environmental planning, spatial analysis, flood mitigation, climate change policy, and natural hazards mitigation.  He has published numerous scientific articles on flood risk and mitigation, and recently authored the book, Rising Waters: The causes and consequences of flooding in the United States published by Cambridge University Press.  Dr. Brody teaches graduate courses in environmental planning and sustainable/resilient coastal development.  He has also worked in both the public and private sectors to help local coastal communities to environmental and flood mitigation plans.  For more information, please visit www.tamug.edu/ctbs or www.tamug.edu/ISCC.

PRESENTATION: PREDICTING URBAN GROWTH IN VULNERABLE COASTAL ENVIRONMENTS 

VIDEO: SESSION 5

 
Day pic 2 w  John Day   
 


 
  John W. Day, Jr. Ph.D. is Distinguished Professor Emeritus in the Department of Oceanography and Coastal Sciences, School of the Coast & Environment at Louisiana State University, where he has taught since 1971. He has published extensively on the ecology and management of coastal and wetland ecosystems and has over 200 peer-reviewed publications. He is co-editor (with B. Crump, M. Kemp, and A. Yáñez-Arancibia) of Estuarine Ecology 2013, coeditor (with C. Hall) of Ecological Modeling in Theory and Practice, coeditor (with W. Conner) of The Ecology of the Barataria Basin, An Estuarine Profile, coeditor (with A. Yáñez-Arancibia) of the Ecology of Coastal Ecosystems in the Southern Mexico: The Terminos Lagoon Region, coeditor (with A. Yáñez-Arancibia) of Ecosystem Based Management of the Gulf of Mexico in 2013.    Professor Day received his PhD in marine sciences and environmental sciences from the University of North Carolina in 1971 working with Dr. H.T. Odum.  Since then, he has conducted extensive research on the ecology and management of the Mississippi Delta region and for the last 40 years, has studied coastal ecosystems in Mexico.  He was a visiting professor in the Institute of Marine Sciences of the National University of Mexico in 1978-1979, at the University of Utrecht in the Netherlands during 1986, at the Laboratoire d'Ecologie, Unversité Claude Bernard in Arles France during 1992-93, and in the Department of Geography at Cambridge University in 2000-2001.  He has also worked with the University of Campeche and the Institute of Ecology in Xalapa, Mexico.  From 1992-2004, Professor Day worked in the Mediterranean studying the impacts of climate change on wetlands in Venice Lagoon and in the Po, Rhone and Ebro deltas.  He is presently working on using wetlands as a means of removing nitrogen from the Mississippi River.  Dr. Day also served as a member of the hypoxia reassessment taskforce and published with Dr. William Mitsch on this subject. He is currently involved in research on the impacts of 21st century megatrends on sustainability of natural and human systems.  He served as chair of the National Technical Review Committee reviewing the restoration program for the Mississippi delta and is currently active in delta restoration.  He served as chair of the Science and Engineering Special Team on restoration of the Mississippi delta (a book on this effort was published in 2014).  He serves on the Scientific Steering Committee of the Land Ocean Interactions in the Coastal Zone, an international coastal science effort.  He is the recipient of a Fulbright Fellowship for study in France and the Estuarine Research Federation Cronin Award for excellence in teaching in coastal sciences.  He has served as major professor for 68 MS and PhD students. 

PRESENTATION: IMPLICATIONS OF 21ST CENTURY META-TRENDS FOR GULF COAST SUSTAINABILITY 

VIDEO: KEYNOTE SESSION

 
Ken Medlock   

PRESENTATION: POLICY & SUSTAINABILITY

VIDEO: SESSION 6

 
David Mohrig    David Mohrig, Ph.D.


VIDEO: PANEL DISCUSSION
 
 
Nittrouer Jeff pic 2 w
Jeff Nittrouer 
   
Jeffrey Nittrouer, Ph.D. is a professor of Geology at Rice University. Dr. Nittrouer received is Ph.D. at the University of Texas at Austin (2010, Geology), and completed a post-doctoral fellowship at the University of Illinois (2012, Geology and Civil and Environmental Engineering). His research examines sediment transport, hydrology, and morphodynamics of fluvial, deltaic, and coastal systems, in order to understand how physical processes interact to shape the Earth's surface, over modern to geological timescales. He is the Principal Investigator for The Stress Nexus of Coastlines project funded by the Shell Center for Sustainability.

PRESENTATION: SEDIMENT SUPPLY 

VIDEO: SESSION 2

 
Padgett pic 2 w
Jamie Padgett   
  Jamie E. Padgett, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering at Rice University in Houston, TX.  Padgett’s research focuses on the application of probabilistic methods for risk assessment of structures, including the quantification of infrastructure sustainability.  Her work addresses the protection of structural infrastructure such as bridges or oil storage tanks exposed to multiple hazards, including earthquakes, hurricanes, or aging and deterioration.  Dr. Padgett is Chair of the ASCE technical committee on Multiple Hazard Mitigation, and serves on the executive committee for the Technical Council on Lifeline Earthquake Engineering (TCLEE).  She currently serves on editorial boards for the ASCEJournal of Bridge Engineering, and Earthquakes and Structures.  Dr. Padgett has received several awards and recognitions including the 2011 National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award and ASCE’s 2009 New Face of Civil Engineering for her work in the field of infrastructure risk assessment and protection.  Her research has been supported by such agencies as the National Science Foundation, Transportation Research Board, Shell Center for Sustainability, and Houston Endowment.

PRESENTATION: STORM IMPACTS ON SELECT ENERGY AND TRANSPORTATION INFRASTRUCTURE

VIDEO: SESSION 4